Kicking Back with Keiko

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While I’m more of a Chinese tea person (now), I’ve never lost my fascination with Japanese tea. I love Gyokuro and Genmaicha and I still have many lovely memories of drinking the freshest, tastiest sencha in Shizuoka all those years ago. I was invited by Kaylin, another tea-loving Singaporean who is distributing Keiko Japanese Green Tea in Singapore. Keiko is a German-Japanese tea brand that has a plantation in Kagoshima in Southern Japan. It’s supposed to be a really fertile area because there’s an active volcano nearby. Their teas are also Certifie Agriculture Biologique organic-certified and is also packed using some high-tech method involving nitrogen to retain freshness (sorry, these techie things I tend to gloss over). But yes, some excellent quality tea here! 

This week, I wanted to wind down after some crazy work stuff and was so glad to have this little tea tasting session in the middle of the week with Kaylin. I also got acquainted with some other Japanese teas which I’ve had little exposure to during this session. Here’s what I sampled: 

Sencha: This gave me an idea that I was in for some really good teas ahead. It was a smooth, almost milky green tea that left a slight apricot aftertaste. 

Kabuse No. 2: Kabuse is a semi-shaded type of green tea that is known for its sweetness and aroma. It is not as “umami” as a gyokuro, but it definitely has its charm. It reminded me a bit of a green bean soup dessert, very drinkable and refreshing. 

Shincha: This is a rare batch of early spring tea that is actually fluorescent green. Interestingly enough, there’s this slight citrus afternote – a taste profile I’d never expect for a Japanese green tea but oh well, you learn something new everyday!

Tenbu Fuka: I really like this tea, it packs in a super umami punch! The Tenbu Fuka is plucked in mid-April and has a dark green liquor colour because it has been intensively steamed. 

Benifuuki: This tea is supposed to have a really high content of EGCG3 (the antioxidant that green tea is known for) which is supposed to help with sinus allergies. It’s also the most bitter of the lot – apparently, many Japanese love this tea and drink copious amounts of it before winter season starts. 

Kabuse Genaicha + Matcha: My absolute favourite of the lot – I bought a box home and it’s my morning “start-up” drink now! Kaylin pointed out that even the roasted rice puffs in this tea are organic. Might I also add that they are also incredibly fun to crunch on after I’m done brewing the tea ;) Usually, Genmaicha can get pretty weak on the green tea part, but because of the matcha, this tea really packs in a punch and is a beautiful dark jade colour. 

Kabuse Houjicha: This roasted tea is very malty and caramelled ( “mass houjicha” served in Korean and Japanese restaurants and sold in Daiso pales in comparison in terms of intensity of flavour) and I love the slightly bitter vanilla notes at the end. I would like to try this iced sometime with perhaps a little drizzle of honey! 

Overall, I really enjoyed my first Keiko experience and it’s actually pretty affordable too with prices ranging from USD$9.60-48.10 for a 50gm box. Again, SO HAPPY more great tea is making its way to Singapore!

WHERE YOU CAN BUY KEIKO TEAS: 

- Their online store (For Singapore, there’s free delivery for orders above USD$30)

- ISETAN supermarkets at Scotts Orchard and Westgate Mall

- Selected health shops such as That Health Shop (Roxy Square) and Lins Healing Concierge (Valley Point). 

*From 1-14 Sept 2014, there’ll be a Keiko tea booth at the Level 2 Atrium of Westgate Mall where you can sample and purchase their teas! Do drop by if you happen to be shopping there! 

And lastly, feel free to join their Facebook page and/or Instagram page (@keikoexperiece) for all kinds of Japanese tea trivia and pretty pics. 

Eagle Tea Merchant: May You Soar to Great Heights!

This post was something I’d wanted to do ages ago, but better late than never I guess. And it’s kind of fitting to promote a local tea company on National Day heh.

Sometime in June, the ladies from Pekoe & Imp asked if I wanted to accompany them for a puerh tasting session. Immediately, a vision of going to some old, dusty Chinese tea shop and having some bearded uncle tsk-tsking me for knowing nothing about puerh came to mind. But I thought that sounded quite exotic (am a little perverse that way) and agreed to go.

Eventually, I found myself going to some industrial building and meeting this guy in a modern grey office space.
eagle1This is Alex, who recently set up an online tea shop called Eagle Tea Merchant that specialises in (pretty affordable!) puerh. We were all pretty surprised when we met him. Imp said he sounded “youngish” over the e-mails, and we were expecting someone in his mid-30s perhaps, but no, it was this zesty guy in his 20s who talked really fast and giggled a lot.

We had a pretty long tea chat that afternoon. Alex has spent a few years researching on puerh and teaware in Yunnan and quite frankly, I get quite lost when he’s “talking puerh” with the serious tea people because a lot of Mandarin is involved. But suffice to say, he knows his stuff and he made an effort to explain things to me as simply as possible. He seems to like raw puerh a lot. And they all tasted quite lovely with lovely plummy, raisin, fruity, nectariney notes.

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This is a 2013 昔归生普耳 (Xigui Raw Puerh).

Anyway, here’s an observation. I notice that most of the Singaporean guys here who express an inclination towards tea will almost always say their favourite type of tea is puerh. I’m not sure if it’s because puerh is seen as more manly or it’s something to do with testosteroney tastebuds. Whatever the case, I think that if you’re a not-too-uncle male in Singapore who would really like to know more about puerh, then Eagle Tea Merchant is the place to start! Contact Alex and arrange a tasting session. It’s a very friendly, bro sort of environment. In fact, soon after my session at Eagle Tea Merchant, a male reader of this blog dropped me a note about his love for puerh. I referred him to Alex and he has become a big Eagle fan ever since. True story!

Eagle Tea Merchant
28 Sin Ming Lane #04-145
Midview City
Singapore 573972

E-mail alex@eagleteamerchant.com if you’d like to arranging a tasting session :)

The Longjing Lineup

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I just realised last week that I have quite a bit of Longjing green tea to consume. TeaVivre had kindly sent over a HUGE package of green tea samples from their Spring range last month, and I’d also received a tin of TeaVivre’s Organic Nonpareil She Qian Dragon Well from imp.

And so, I decided I would taste all of them Longjings at one go.

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In general, all the leaves look gorgeous. Sorry I can’t be more technical about it. But put it this way, I’ve seen what bad, stale Longjing looks like at certain atas hotel cafes that don’t store them properly (brownish, kind of damp-looking and possibly mouldy) and these leaves are just the opposite: green and crunchy looking.

Here’s what I tried:

Organic Superfine Dragon Well: From Tian Mu Mountain. It smelled kind of toasty/smoky so I was surprised that when I drank it, it was smooth bodied and there was this natural honeyed sweetness at the end. A surprising tea.

Premium Grade Dragon Well: From Xi Hu (West Lake). It had that steamed chicken aroma that I’ve come to associate with Longjing, and there were some pleasant umami notes in the brew. It was a little more astringent (‘siap’) compared to the Organic Superfine Dragon Well.

Organic Non Pareil Ming Qian Dragon Well: From Tian Mu Mountain. It had an interesting dewy, smoky aroma and was very mellow and vegetal. A nice kick-back sort of tea.

Organic Nonpareil She Qian Dragon Well: From Tian Mu Mountain. I’ve had this tea several times and I’m always amazed at how sweet it is no matter how crudely I make it. It smells like a steamed lotus paste pao and its chestnutty brew also has this woody depth to it. I think this is my favourite Dragon, ROAR!

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I was actually wondering if they would all taste the same to me, then this would be a really boring review. But hey, they don’t! And once again, I’m amazed at how each tea has all these fascinating nuances, even if they are the same type of tea from the same season!

My 1872 Clipper Tea Review (With An Iced Lychee Mint Recipe!)

Last Month, The 1872 Clipper Tea Co. very kindly gave me a $50 voucher to shop at their online store. I seldom buy tea online, but I generally found their e-store a very pleasing experience with soothing watercolours :) I also like the fact that there’s free delivery for orders above S$50!

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Here’s what I bought:

 

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- Finest Darjeeling (S$25): 100g of Darjeeling Margaret’s Hope (Grade: TGFOP1 2nd flush)

- Lychee Tea (S$11): 24 sachets of black tea flavoured with sweet lychee

- Peppermint (S$12): 20 sachets of peppermint tea

I have to say my selection of teas were pretty fortuitous. For the Darjeeling tea, I’ve already finished almost half the pouch within the month already! A few weeks ago, I caught a nasty “childcare” stomach flu bug from my son and began to crave black sweetened tea when I couldn’t stomach solid food for those few days. My mum used to make me a cup of Lipton tea with two spoonfuls of sugar whenever I had a bad tummy as a child, and I guess it was an old comfort I wanted to revisit. Of course, this time, my black tea had some lovely honeyed muscatel notes, so much so I didn’t see the need to put sugar in it eventually.

This week has been especially hot, and to top things off, the overworked air-conditioners at my place decided to conk out together in solidarity. And it was out of pure “sianness” that I decided to make myself a fancy pitcher of iced tea to cheer myself up – hot weather really gets you in a pissy mood, doesn’t it? I decided to come up with my own concoction of an Iced Lychee Mint tea (undoubtedly inspired by the iced lychee oolong tea I’ve had at Tea Bone Zen Mind) and this concoction even pleased my un-tea, fussy-with-food-and-drink husband who declared it “wonderfully refreshing”.

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Here’s the recipe for my Iced Lychee Mint Tea:

- 1 sachet of Peppermint

- 2 sachets of Lychee Tea

- 500ml of boiling water

- Canned lychee

- Ice cubes

- Optional: syrup

Steep the Peppermint and Lychee Tea sachets for 3 minutes in the boiling water. Let the brew cool down. Top with ice cubes, lychee pieces and a few teaspoonfuls of the syrup from the canned lychee. If you like your iced tea sweet, you can add a bit of your own sugar syrup as well. The lychee black tea, quite obviously, really goes with the chunks of lychee and I really like that minty aftertaste while drinking this tea – it brings cooling down to another level heh. Let me know how it goes if you try preparing this tea at home!

Review: Chinese Teas from TeaVivre

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I got a lovely surprise in the beginning of the year – a little box of tea samples of TeaVivre, an up and coming online tea retailer who is REALLY serious about tea. Just check any of their product pages and you get encyclopaedic information about each tea variant – such a wonderful resource.

This was the time I was also trying to sort out my teaware, so in this review, you’ll also get to see some of my tea utensils :)

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Superfine Taiwan Moderately-Roasted Dong Ding Oolong

The first tea I tried was their Superfine Taiwan Moderately-Roasted Dong Ding Oolong. I’m trying to be more open to darker teas these days, and I think this was the perfect tea to bridge over to “the dark side”! It’s mellow and toasty, and I was pleasantly surprised by its sweetness as I was expecting something more earthy. I was also particularly frazzled that day and this tea was perfect in helping me to chill out a little.

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Premium Tai Ping Hou Kui

The second tea I tried was their Premium Tai Ping Hou Kui green tea. Initially, I was a little suspicious about how these broad tea leaves were able to fit into the smallish packaging but when I opened it, I was greeted with sweet-smelling, intact tea leaves. This was also delightful to drink – with a creamy texture and this (for lack of better word) sweetbeany taste. A little tip for drinking this tea: steep it in barely warm water (I did half room temperature water, half hot water – sorry, no thermometer to tell you the temperature)  to slowly get its goodness out!

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Superfine Taiwan Qing Xiang Dong Ding Oolong

The third tea I tried was the Superfine Taiwan Qing Xiang Dong Ding Oolong. I only became aware of the existence of such a tea last year, and am not surprised that it has many fans! A very easy light oolong to drink with honeyed vegetal notes and a lovely floral aroma. It also has that nice milky texture.

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Organic Superfine Dragon Well Long Jing

I remember how my friend Jill described Long Jing as “chicken soup”. With TeaVivre’s Organic Superfine Dragon Well Long Jing however, I also got raw chestnut notes along with the usual umami taste profile and I was just so besotted with the dark emerald colour of the leaves. I have friends who have stopped drinking tea because they are concerned with pesticides being sprayed on the leaves – well I’d say this would be a good option for them to make a prodigal return (the tea is certified organic by USDA, EU and JAS – it cannot get more credible than that).

Overall: I’m very impressed with the quality of teas that TeaVivre offers and how it emphasises on how one should make informed, educational choices when buying tea! And judging by the many rave reviews it’s been getting from tea bloggers all over the world, I’m not the only one :) 

Sidenote: I also feature Stella from Tea Vivre in my Tea Loves section. What a wonderful job she has!

Meeting Liz Steel for Tea

One of the most popular posts on this blog is my Tea Loves interview with Liz Steel. I’m guessing it’s because of all her beautiful tea sketches! (I’ve also written about her on T Ching.)

I finally had to chance to meet her in real life when she swung by Singapore last week and we had a lovely tea tasting session at Tea Bone Zen Mind (TBZM).

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TBZM’s owner, Carrie, was so enchanted by her sketching; she said it was refreshing to look at “art without ego” (I guess she expressed it a lot more poetically than how I yap about Liz’s “happy drawings”). She kindly let us try many special things, including an aged 40-year-old kukicha and an intriguing tea salt infusion!

I’m glad I introduced the two like-minded ladies to each other – both tea lovers and inspiring artists in their own right :)

Top Tea Moments of 2013

Oh my! Yet another year is coming to an end. I am drinking Longjing tea right now while trying to come up with a sum-up post of sorts. I am also trying to come up with some healthy new-year resolutions involving tea. But in the meantime, here are my favourite moments with tea this year:

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My first cup of tea in Taipei.
I was terribly groggy. I’d just gone bookshop shopping at Eslite. I sat down in this little basement stall of a shopping mall where a guy very carefully brewed a mug of Shan Lin Xi oolong using thermometers, measuring cups and ceramic teaware. And I sipped it very slowly while browsing through my new books.

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Tea grazing.
One of my most relaxing 2013 afternoons with casual tea tasting with the ladies of Pekoe & Imp. If you don’t already know by now, Imp is pretty slick in tea brewing and uses both cheem algebra and mystical “leaf coaxing” to come up with some lovely teas.

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Using my most expensive teaware for the first time.
I bought a Hakka Blue Pear Pot Set as a Christmas present for myself after attending the Tea Time in Taiwan fair. I’m not sure if it was psychological, but I thought I came up with a pretty exquisite brew of Tieguanyin and my non-tea husband also felt very happy drinking from this very pretty tea set.

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Pomelo tea at Cafe Pal.
It was a rainy day and this was the perfect pulpy tangy hot drink after some awesome Thai food and catching up with an old friend.

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Iced lychee oolong at Tea Bone Zen Mind.
It was a scorching hot afternoon. I always buy several bags of of lychee oolong back after every visit!

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